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Nobel Prize for Physics

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Nobel Prize for Physics

Physics is one of the five prize areas mentioned in Alfred Nobel’s will. The will was, however, partly incomplete. Nobel simply stated that prizes be given to those who, during the preceding year, “shall have conferred the greatest benefit on mankind” and that one part be given to the person who “shall have made the most important discovery or invention within the field of physics.”

Nobel Prize Physics Laureates

Nobel Prize Physics Laureates

1901 : W. C. Röntgen ( Germany, 1845 – 03 – 27 – 1923 – 02 – 10 ) Discovery of X rays.

1902 : Hendrik A. Lorentz ( Netherlands, 1853 – 07 – 18 – 1929 – 02 – 04 ) Pieter Zeeman ( Netherlands, 1865 – 05 – 25 – 1943 – 10 – 09 ).

1903 : Henri A. Becquerel ( France, 1852 – 12 – 15 – 1908 – 08 – 25 ) Marie Curie ( France, Poland, 1867 – 11 – 07 – 1934 – 07 – 04 ) Pierre Curie ( France, 1859 – 05 – 15 – 1906 – 04 – 19 ) Discovery of radioactivity.

1904 : Lord Rayleigh ( United Kingdom ).

1905 : Philipp E. Lenard ( Germany, 1862 – 06 – 07 – 1947 – 05 – 20 ).

1906 : Joseph J. Thomson ( United Kingdom, 1856 – 12 – 18 – 1940 – 04 – 30 ) Conduction of electricity in gases.

1907 : Albert A. Michelson ( USA, 1852 – 12 – 19 – 1931 – 05 – 09 ) Measurement of the speed of light.

1908 : G. Lippmann ( France ).

1909 : Karl Ferdinand Braun ( Germany, 1850 – 06 – 06 – 1918 – 04 – 20 ) Guglielmo Marconi ( Italy, 1874 – 04 – 25 – 1937 – 07 – 20 ) wireless telegraphy.General Studies Question Bank CD

1910 : Johann D. van der Waals ( Netherlands, 1837 – 11 – 23 – 1923 – 03 – 07 ) Molecular forces.

1911 : Wilhelm Wien ( Germany, 1864 – 01 – 13 – 1928 – 08 – 30 ) Heat radiation.

1912 : G. Dalén ( Sweden ).

1913 : H. Kamerlingh Onnes ( Netherlands ).

1914 : Max von Laue ( Germany, 1879 – 10 – 09 – 1960 – 04 – 24 ) Diffraction and interference of X rays by the arrangement of atoms in crystals ( Laue diagrams ).

1915 : Sir William Henry Bragg ( United Kingdom, 1862 – 07 – 02 – 1942 – 03 – 12 ) William Lawrence Bragg ( United Kingdom, 1890 – 03 – 31 – 1971 – 07 – 01 ) Investigation of crystal structures by X ray spectroscopy.

1917 : Ch. G. Barkia ( United Kingdom ).

1918 : Max Planck ( Germany, 1858 – 04 – 23 – 1947 – 10 – 04 ) Studies on thermodynamics and radiation.

1919 : Johannes Stark ( Germany, 1874 – 04 – 25 – 1957 – 06 – 21 ) Splitting of spectral lines in electrical fields ( Stark effect ).

1920 : Ch. E. Guillaume ( Switzerland ).

1921 : Albert Einstein ( Germany, 1879 – 03 – 14 – 1955 – 04 – 18 ) Theory of the photoelectric effect ( light quantum hypothesis ).

1922 : Niels Bohr ( Denmark, 1885 – 10 – 07 – 1962 – 11 – 18 ) Quantum theoretical atomic model.

1923 : Robert A. Millikan ( USA, 1868 – 03 – 22 – 1953 – 12 – 19 ) Measurement of the electron charge.

1924 : Karl M. G. Siegbahn ( Sweden, 1886 – 1978 ).

1925 : James Franck ( Germany, 1882 – 08 – 20 – 1964 – 05 – 21 ) Gustav Hertz ( Germany, 1887 – 07 – 21 – 1975 – 10 – 30 ) Studies on atomic and quantum theory ( excitation and ionization spectra of dilute gases ).

1926 : Jean B. Perrin ( France, 1870 – 09 – 30 – 1942 – 04 – 17 ) Studies on the discontinuous structure of matter.

1927 : Arthur H. Compton ( USA ) Ch. Th. R. Wilson ( United Kingdom ).

1928 : O. W. Richardson ( United Kingdom ).

1929 : Prince Louis Victor de Broglie ( France, 1892 – 08 – 15 – 1987 – 03 – 19 ) Studies on wave mechanics.

1930 : Sir Ch. V. Raman ( India, 1888 – 11 – 07 – 1970 – 11 – 21 ) Raman effect on light scattering by molecules.

1932 : Werner Heisenberg ( Germany, 1901 – 12 – 05 – 1976 – 02 – 01 ) Quantum theory.

1933 : Paul A. M. Dirac ( United Kingdom, 1902 – 08 – 08 – 1984 – 10 – 21 ) Erwin Schrödinger ( Austria, 1887 – 08 – 12 – 1961 – 01 – 04 ) Quantum theory, wave mechanics.

1935 : James Chadwick ( United Kingdom, 1891 – 10 – 20 – 1974 – 07 – 24 ) Discovery of the neutron.

1936 : C. D. Anderson ( USA ) V. F. Heß ( Austria ).

1937 : C. J. Davisson ( USA ) G. P. Thomson ( United Kingdom ).

1938 : Enrico Fermi ( Italy, 1901 – 09 – 29 – 1954 – 11 – 28 ) Discovery of nuclear transformations by irradiation with neutrons.

1939 : Ernest O. Lawrence ( USA, 1901 – 08 – 08 – 1958 – 08 – 27 ) Invention of the cyclotron.

1943 : Otto Stern ( USA, 1888 – 02 – 17 – 1969 – 08 – 18 ) Molecular rays, magnetic properties of the proton.

1944 : Isidor I. Rabi ( USA, 1898 – 07 – 29 – 1988 – 01 – 11 ) Studies on the magnetic properties of atomic nuclei.

1945 : Wolfgang Pauli ( Austria, 1900 – 04 – 25 – 1958 – 12 – 15 ) quantum physical Pauli principle.

1946 : Percy W. Bridgman ( USA ).

1947 : Sir Edward Victor Appleton ( United Kingdom, 1892 – 1965 ) for his discovery of the so – called Appleton layer of the ionosphere, which is a dependable reflector of radio waves and as such useful in communication.

1948 : Patrick Maynard Stuart Blackett ( United Kingdom, 1897 – 1974 ) for his discoveries in the field of cosmic radiation.

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1949 : Hideki Yukawa( Japan, 1907 – 07 – 23 – 1981 – 09 – 09 ) Prediction of the existence of mesons.

1950 : C. F. Powell ( United Kingdom ).

1951 : Sir J. D. Cockcroft ( United Kingdom ) E. Th. S. Walton ( Ireland ).

1952 : Felix Bloch ( USA, 1905 – 10 – 23 – 1983 – 09 – 10 ) Edward M. Purcell ( USA, *1912 – 08 – 30 ) Development of a novel precision method of nuclear magnetism ( NMR ).

1953 : F. Zernike ( Netherlands ).

1954 : Max Born ( United Kingdom, Germany, 1882 – 12 – 11 – 1970 – 01 – 05 ) Walther Bothe ( Germany, 1891 – 01 – 08 – 1957 – 02 – 08 ).

1955 : P. Kusch ( USA ) W. E. Lamb ( USA ).

1956 : John Bardeen ( USA, 1908 – 05 – 23 – 1991 – 01 – 30 ) Walter H. Brattain ( USA, 1902 – 02 – 10 – 1987 – 10 – 14 ) William Shockley ( USA, *1910 – 02 – 13 ) Development of the transistor.

1957 : T. D. Lee ( China ) Ch. N. Yang ( China ).

1958 : I. M. Frank ( Soviet Union ) I. E. Tamm ( Soviet Union ) P. A. Cherenkov ( Soviet Union ).

1959 : O. Chamberlain ( USA ) E. Segre ( USA, Italy ).

1960 : D. A. Glaser ( USA ).

1961 : R. Hofstadter ( USA ) Rudolf Mößbauer ( Germany, *1929 – 01 – 29 ).

1962 : L. D. Landau ( Soviet Union ).

1963 : Maria Goeppert – Mayer ( USA, Germany ) H. D. Jensen ( Germany ) Eugene Paul Wigner ( USA, Hungary, 1902 – 02 – 17 – 1995 – 01 – 03 ).

1964 : N. Basov ( Soviet Union, *1922 – 12 – 14 ) A. Prokhorov ( Soviet Union, *1916 – 07 – 11 ) Charles Townes ( USA, *1915 – 07 – 28 ) Laser, Maser.

1965 : Richard P. Feynman ( USA, 1918 – 05 – 11 – 1988 – 02 – 15 ) J. Schwinger ( USA ) S. Tomonaga ( Japan ).

1966 : A. Kastler ( France ).

1967 : Hans A. Bethe ( USA, Germany, *1906 – 07 – 02 ) Studies on the theory of nuclear reactions.

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1968 : L. W. Alvarez ( USA ).

1969 : M. Gell – Mann ( USA ).

1970 : H. Alfvén ( Sweden ) L. Néel ( France ).

1971 : D. Gabor ( United Kingdom ).

1972 : John Bardeen ( USA, 1908 – 05 – 23 – 1991 – 01 – 30 ) L. N. Cooper ( USA ) J. R. Schrieffer ( USA ) Theory of superconductivity.

1973 : L. Esaki ( Japan ) I. Giaever ( USA, Norway ) B. Josephson ( United Kingdom ).

1974 : M. Ryle ( United Kingdom ) A. Hewish ( United Kingdom ).

1975 : A. Bohr ( Denmark ) B. Mottelson ( Denmark ) J. Rainwater ( USA ).

1976 : B. Richter ( USA ) S. Ting ( USA ).

1977 : Ph. W. Anderson ( USA ) J. v. Vleck ( USA ) Neville F. Mott ( United Kingdom, 1905 – 09 – 30 – 1996 – 08 – 08 ).

1978 : P. L. Kapitsa ( Soviet Union, 1894 – 06 – 26 – 1984 – 04 – 08 ) A. Penzias ( USA ) R. Wilson ( USA ).

1979 : Sheldon Lee Glashow ( USA, *1932 – 12 – 05 ) Steven Weinberg ( USA, *1933 – 05 – 03 ) Unification of the weak and electromagnetic interaction A. Salam ( Pakistan ).

1980 : J. W. Cronin ( USA ) V. L. Fitch ( USA ).

1981 : N. Bloembergen ( USA ) A. L. Schawlow ( USA ) Kai Manne Siegbahn ( Sweden, *1918 – 04 – 20 ).

1982 : Kenneth G. Wilson ( USA, *1936 – 06 – 08 ) Theory of phase transitions and critical phenomena.

1983 : S. Chandrasekhar ( USA ) William A. Fowler ( USA, *1911 – 08 – 09 ) Importance of nuclear reactions for the formation of chemical elements in the universe.

1984 : Carlo Rubbia ( Italy, *1934 ) Simon van der Meer ( Netherlands, *1925 – 11 – 24 ) Basic studies on particle physics.

1985 : Klaus v. Klitzing ( Germany, *1943 – 06 – 28 ) Discovery of the quantum Hall effect.

1986 : Ernst Ruska ( Germany, 1906 – 12 – 25 – 1988 – 05 – 27 ) Gerd Binnig ( Germany, *1947 – 07 – 20 ) Heinrich Rohrer ( Switzerland, *1933 – 06 – 06 ) Electron microscope and raster tunnel microscope, respectively.

1987 : Johannes Georg Bednorz ( Germany, *1950 – 05 – 16 ) Karl Alex Müller ( Switzerland, *1927 – 04 – 20 ) High temperature superconductors.

1988 : Leon Max Lederman ( USA ) Melvin Schwartz ( USA ) Jack Steinberger ( USA ).General Studies Question Bank CD

1989 : Wolfgang Paul ( Germany, *1913 – 08 – 10 ) Hans Georg Dehmelt ( USA, Germany ) Norman Foster Ramsey ( USA, *1915 – 08 – 27 ).

1990 : Jerome I. Friedman ( USA, *1930 – 03 – 28 ) Henry W. Kendall ( USA, *1926 – 12 – 09 ) Richard E. Taylor ( Canada, *1929 – 11 – 02 ) Inelastic scattering of electrons by protons and bound neutrons, development of the quark model.

1991 : Pierre – Gilles de Gennes ( France, *1932 ) Theoretical description of ordering phenomena of liquid crystals, polymers, magnets and superconductors.

1992 : Georges Charpak ( France, *1924 ) Invention of detectors for the detection of rare interactions of elementary particles.

1993 : Russell A. Hulse ( USA, *1950 ) Joseph Taylor jr. ( USA, *1941 ).

1994 : Bertram N. Brockhouse ( Canada ) Clifford G. Shull ( USA ) Studies on neutron beams.

1995 : Martin L. Perl ( USA, *1927 ) for the discovery of the tau lepton Frederick Reines ( USA, *1918 ) for the detection of the neutrino.

1996 : David M. Lee ( USA, *1931 ) Douglas D. Osheroff ( USA, *1945 ) Robert C. Richardson ( USA, *1937 ) for their discovery of superfluidity in helium – 3.

1997 : Steven Chu ( USA, *1948 ) Claude Cohen – Tannoudji ( France, *1933 ) William D. Phillips ( USA, *1948 ) for development of methods to cool and trap atoms with laser light.

1998 : Robert B. Laughlin ( USA, *1950 ) Horst L. Störmer ( Germany / USA, *1949 ) Daniel C. Tsui ( USA, *1939 ) for their discovery of a new form of quantum fluid with fractionally charged excitations ( electrons acting together in strong magnetic fields, fractional quantum Hall effect ).

1999 : Gerardus ‘t Hooft ( Netherlands, *1946 ) Martinus J.G. Veltman ( Netherlands, *1931 ) for elucidating the quantum structure of electroweak interactions in physics.

2000 : Zhores I. Alferov ( Russia, *1930 ) Herbert Kroemer ( Germany / USA, *1928 ) for developing semiconductor heterostructures used in high – speed – and opto – electronics Jack S. Kilby ( USA, *1923 ) for his part in the invention of the integrated circuit.

2001 :  Eric A. Cornell  and  Carl E. Wieman for the achievement of Bose-Einstein condensation in dilute gases of alkali atoms, and for early fundamental studies of the properties of the condensates.

2002 : Raymond Davis Jr. and  Masatoshi Koshiba for pioneering contributions to astrophysics, in particular for the detection of cosmic neutrinos.

Riccardo Giacconi for pioneering contributions to astrophysics, which have led to the discovery of cosmic X-ray sources”

2003 : Alexei A. Abrikosov, Vitaly L. Ginzburg and Anthony J. Leggett for pioneering contributions to the theory of superconductors and superfluids.

2004 : David J. Gross, H. David Politzer and Frank Wilczek for the discovery of asymptotic freedom in the theory of the strong interaction.

2005 : Roy J. Glauber for his contribution to the quantum theory of optical coherence.

John L. Hall and Theodor W. Hänsch for their contributions to the development of laser-based precision spectroscopy, including the optical frequency comb technique.

2006 : John C. Mather and George F. Smoot for their discovery of the blackbody form and anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation.

2007 : Albert Fert and Peter Grünberg for the discovery of Giant Magnetoresistance.

2008 : Yoichiro Nambu for the discovery of the mechanism of spontaneous broken symmetry in subatomic physics.

Makoto Kobayashi and Toshihide Maskawa for the discovery of the origin of the broken symmetry which predicts the existence of at least three families of quarks in nature.

2009 : Charles Kuen Kao for groundbreaking achievements concerning the transmission of light in fibers for optical communication.

Willard S. Boyle and George E. Smith for the invention of an imaging semiconductor circuit – the CCD sensor.

2010 : Andre Geim and Konstantin Novoselov for groundbreaking experiments regarding the two-dimensional material graphene.

2011 : Saul Perlmutter, Brian P. Schmidt and Adam G. Riess for the discovery of the accelerating expansion of the Universe through observations of distant supernovae.

2012 : Serge Haroche and David J. Wineland for ground-breaking experimental methods that enable measuring and manipulation of individual quantum systems.

2013 : François Englert and Peter W. Higgs for the theoretical discovery of a mechanism that contributes to our understanding of the origin of mass of subatomic particles, and which recently was confirmed through the discovery of the predicted fundamental particle, by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at CERN’s Large Hadron Collider.

 

Nobel Prize Physics Articles

Nobel Prize Physics Articles

The Nobel Prize in Physics 1901 – 1999 by Erik B. Karlsson A review of the Prize in Physics in the last 100 years.

The Dual Nature of Light by Gosta Ekspong Is light a wave motion Or is it a stream of particles.

Marie and Pierre Curie and the Discovery of Polonium and Radium by Nanny Fröman On December 26, 1896, Marie and Pierre Curie came upon a very active substance they later called radium.

On Being a Scientist A Personal View by John C. Polanyi What is the responsibility of scientists to society 1986 Chemistry Laureate John C. Polanyi shares his views.

How the Sun Shines by John N. Bacall How does the sun produce vast amounts of energy necessary to support life on earth.

The Role of Science and Technology in Future Design by Jerome Karle 1985 Chemistry Laureate Jerome Karle discusses the interaction of science and society.

History of Caltech by Judith Goodstein From a modest little college to one of the world’s foremost training centers in physics, chemistry and engineering.

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Nobel Prize Physics Educational

Nobel Prize Physics Educational

Tools and Exploration : Read the illustrated and animated story about the tools used by physicists to investigate Nature. Read the illustrated and animated story about the tools used by physicists to investigate Nature. Experimental physicists work in laboratories equipped with facilities and detectors. Mathematics has always been the primary tool of the theoretical physicist.

Nobel Posters : Illustrated presentations of Nobel Prizes in Physics.

1988 : The neutrino beam method and the demonstration of the doublet structure of the leptons through the discovery of the muon neutrino by Leon M. Lederman, Melvin Schwartz and Jack Steinberger.

1989 : The invention of the separated oscillatory fields method and its use in the hydrogen maser and other atomic clocks by Norman F. Ramsey, and the development of the ion trap technique by Hans G. Dehmelt and Wolfgang Paul.General Studies Question Bank CD

1990 : The pioneering investigations concerning deep inelastic scattering of electrons on protons and bound neutrons, which have been of essential importance for the development of the quark model in particle physics by Jerome I. Friedman, Henry W. Kendall, and Richard E. Taylor.

1991 : The discovery that methods developed for studying order phenomena in simple systems can be generalized to more complex forms of matter, in particular to liquid crystals and polymers by Pierre – Gilles de Gennes.

1992 : The invention and development of particle detectors, in particular the multiwire proportional chamber by Georges Charpak.

1993 : The discovery of a new type of pulsar, a discovery that has opened up new possibilities for the study of gravitation by Russell A. Hulse and Joseph H. Taylor, Jr.

1994 : The development of neutron spectroscopy by Bertram N. Brockhouse and the development of the neutron diffraction technique by Clifford G. Shull.

1995 : The pioneering experimental contributions to lepton physics by Martin L. Perl and the detection of the neutrino by Frederick Reines.

1996 : The discovery of superfluidity in helium – 3 by David M. Lee, Douglas D. Osheroff and Robert C. Richardson.

1997 : The development of methods to cool and trap atoms with laser light by Steven Chu, Claude Cohen – Tannoudji and William D. Phillips.

1998 : The discovery of a new form of quantum fluid with fractionally charged excitations by Robert B. Laughlin, Horst L. Störmer, and Daniel C. Tsui.

1999 : Elucidating the quantum structure of electroweak interactions in physics by Gerardus ‘t Hooft and Martinus J. G. Veltman.

2000 : Basic work on information and communication technology. Zhores I. Alferov and Herbert Kroemer’s work in developing semiconductor heterostructures used in high – speed – and opto – electronics and Jack S. Kilby’s invention of the integrated circuit.

What happens in the tiny chip. The Chip – All integrated circuits or chips are basically composed of millions of transistors, arranged in various ways to accomplish different tasks… You have two minutes to try to stop the bomb from exploding.

2001 :  The achievement of Bose-Einstein condensation in dilute gases of alkali atoms, and for early fundamental studies of the properties of the condensates by Eric A. Cornell  and  Carl E. Wieman.

2002 : Pioneering contributions to astrophysics, in particular for the detection of cosmic neutrinos by Raymond Davis Jr. and  Masatoshi Koshiba.

Pioneering contributions to astrophysics, which have led to the discovery of cosmic X-ray sources by Riccardo Giacconi.

2003 : Pioneering contributions to the theory of superconductors and super fluids by Alexei A. Abrikosov, Vitaly L. Ginzburg and Anthony J. Leggett.

2004 : Discovery of asymptotic freedom in the theory of the strong interaction by David J. Gross, H. David Politzer and Frank Wilczek.

2005 : Contribution to the quantum theory of optical coherence by Roy J. Glauber.

Contributions to the development of laser-based precision spectroscopy, including the optical frequency comb technique by John L. Hall and Theodor W. Hänsch.

2006 : Discovery of the blackbody form and anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation by John C. Mather and George F. Smoot .

2007 : Discovery of Giant Magnetoresistance by Albert Fert and Peter Grünberg.

2008 : Discovery of the mechanism of spontaneous broken symmetry in subatomic physics by Yoichiro Nambu.

Discovery of the origin of the broken symmetry which predicts the existence of at least three families of quarks in nature by Makoto Kobayashi and Toshihide Maskawa.

2009 : The groundbreaking achievements concerning the transmission of light in fibers for optical communication by Charles Kuen Kao.

The invention of an imaging semiconductor circuit – the CCD sensor by Willard S. Boyle and George E. Smith.

2010 : The  groundbreaking experiments regarding the two-dimensional material graphene by Andre Geim and Konstantin Novoselov.

2011 : The discovery of the accelerating expansion of the Universe through observations of distant supernovae by Saul Perlmutter, Brian P. Schmidt and Adam G. Riess.

2012 : The ground-breaking experimental methods that enable measuring and manipulation of individual quantum systems by Serge Haroche and David J. Wineland.

2013 : The theoretical discovery of a mechanism that contributes to our understanding of the origin of mass of subatomic particles, and which recently was confirmed through the discovery of the predicted fundamental particle, by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at CERN’s Large Hadron Collider by François Englert and Peter W. Higgs.

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Nobel Prize Physics Nomination

Nobel Prize Physics Nomination

1. Each year the respective committees send individual invitations to thousands of scientists, members of academies and university professors in numerous countries, asking them to nominate candidates for the Nobel Prizes for the coming year. Those who are competent to submit nominations are chosen in such a way that as many countries and universities as possible will be represented.

2. These prize nominations must reach the respective Nobel Committees of the Prize Awarding Institutions before February 1 of the year for which the nomination is being made.

3. The nominations received by each committee are then evaluated with the help of specially appointed experts. When the committees have made their selection among the nominated candidates and have presented their recommendations to the Prize Awarding Institutions, a vote is taken for the final choice of Laureates.

4. The choice of the year’s Laureates is announced immediately after the vote in October each year.General Studies Question Bank CD

5. The prizes are awarded at the Prize Award Ceremony at the Concert Hall in Stockholm, Sweden, on December 10 ( the Anniversary of Alfred Nobel’s death ). The Nobel Peace Prize is awarded on the same day at the City Hall in Oslo, Norway.

The procedure to nominate candidates for the Nobel Prizes varies somewhat among the Prize Awarding Institutions.

Physics ( The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences )

Invitations to nominate are sent to :

1. Swedish and foreign members of the Academy of Sciences;

2. Members of the Nobel Committees for Physics and Chemistry;

3. Scientists who have been awarded the Prize by the Academy of Sciences;

4. Permanent and assistant professors in the sciences of Physics and Chemistry at the universities and institutes of technology of Sweden, Denmark, Finland, Iceland and Norway, and Karolinska Institute;

5. Holders of corresponding chairs in at least six universities or university colleges selected by the Academy of Sciences with a view to ensuring the appropriate distribution over the different countries and their seats of learnings; and

6. Other scientists from whom the Academy may see fit to invite proposals.

Decisions as to the selection of the teachers and scientists referred to in paragraphs 5 and 6 above shall be taken each year before the end of the month of September.

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